NewYork/NewJersey
Wildlife Removal, Inc.

 

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Winter Defense Against Pests

As the temperatures drop and the sun sets earlier each night, we know that winter is fast approaching; and the wild animals know it too. As the cold air sets in, many wild animals will look towards houses for shelter. What can you do to protect your home from unwanted animal intruders from entering your home?  As the temperatures drop and the sun sets earlier each night, we know that winter is fast approaching; and the wild animals know it too. As the cold air sets in, many wild animals will look towards houses for shelter. What can you do to protect your home from unwanted animal intruders from entering your home?

Your home has a lot to offer for wild animals. Shelter, warmth, food, water; don’t let animals take advantage of you. animals can utilize the cracks and holes on the roof to gain entry to the attic. Damage to the eaves or near the gutters can allow them to enter walls of your home.

Animals with poor climbing skills (such as rabbits, rats, and skunks) can enter from lower cracks or holes in the walls or foundation of the house. Clean up the yard before the snow starts to fall, in order to prevent dens and burrows to be made by your house.

We specialize in removing squirrels, raccoons, and other pests in the New York New Jersey area. For a complete inspection and evaluation please contact us or call us at 718-227-7227 and we will be happy to make an appointment at your convenience.

Rabid Raccoons in New Jersey

In the month of November, there have been at least 5 raccoons have been captured in different towns in New Jersey carrying rabies. In the beginning of the month, a raccoon attacked a man and his 2 dogs in Audubon. Middletown has had 2 attacks from 2 different rabid raccoons within the first 2 weeks of November. In South River, a rabid raccoon was captured at the start of the month, marking the 12th rabid animal captured in Middlesex county this year. Another raccoon was found near Hopewell. It was captured and confirmed to have rabies. In the month of November, there have been at least 5 raccoons have been captured in different towns in New Jersey carrying rabies. In the beginning of the month, a raccoon attacked a man and his 2 dogs in Audubon. Middletown has had 2 attacks from 2 different rabid raccoons within the first 2 weeks of November. In South River, a rabid raccoon was captured at the start of the month, marking the 12th rabid animal captured in Middlesex county this year. Another raccoon was found near Hopewell. It was captured and confirmed to have rabies.

According to the CDC, raccoons account for almost 30% of all rabies cases in the US, with bats being the only animal to have more reported cases of the disease. Luckily, the number of reported cases of the disease has been on the decline for the past 20 years. Increases in vaccinations to pets and boosters upon contact with animals suspected of carrying the disease have helped mitigate the spread of it. Less than 8% of cases in the US consist of people and domesticated animals.

We specialize in removing squirrels, raccoons, and other pests in the New York New Jersey area. For a complete inspection and evaluation please contact us or call us at 718-227-7227 and we will be happy to make an appointment at your convenience.

Fat Rats

If there is one thing NYC is known for, it’s that the big apple has a big rat problem. But that problem can be getting bigger, in both population, and size. It is no question that rats with more access to food, like those near a city dumpster, can get bigger. But it seems that the size of the average adult rat found in New York City has been on the rise. The average weight of an adult brown rat in NYC is about 300 grams (about 10.5 ounces), as opposed to the worldwide average of 230 grams (8.1 ounces). But in some cases, rats have been found that weigh over 2 pounds. Larger rats have been known to wait until smaller ones eat some of the food, which can help the strongest of the group survive poisoned baits or traps. While bigger rats aren’t necessarily more dangerous, they certainly aren’t any cleaner for the city. Rodents of any size can still be susceptible to or carriers of a wide array of diseases that can be dangerous or even deadly to humans.  If there is one thing NYC is known for, it’s that the big apple has a big rat problem. But that problem can be getting bigger, in both population, and size. It is no question that rats with more access to food, like those near a city dumpster, can get bigger. But it seems that the size of the average adult rat found in New York City has been on the rise. The average weight of an adult brown rat in NYC is about 300 grams (about 10.5 ounces), as opposed to the worldwide average of 230 grams (8.1 ounces). But in some cases, rats have been found that weigh over 2 pounds. Larger rats have been known to wait until smaller ones eat some of the food, which can help the strongest of the group survive poisoned baits or traps. While bigger rats aren’t necessarily more dangerous, they certainly aren’t any cleaner for the city. Rodents of any size can still be susceptible to or carriers of a wide array of diseases that can be dangerous or even deadly to humans.

We specialize in removing squirrels, raccoons, and other pests in the New York New Jersey area. For a complete inspection and evaluation please contact us or call us at 718-227-7227 and we will be happy to make an appointment at your convenience.

Evolution in Urban Life

Wild animals exist within even the densest of human civilizations. The urban jungle is swarming with life; and a lot of it isn’t bipedal. Raccoons, squirrels, rats, and other creatures co-exist with us in our cities and towns. But what does life on the mean streets of New York City do to these animals? A new study published in Science Magazine looked into the effects of cities on animals that are commonly found in urban locations. The results show that these animals are adapting and evolving. Roaches, raccoons, squirrels, lice, and more; are all changing. Each new generation is adapting more and more to the environment. The result of this adaptation is incredible resilience. Wild animals exist within even the densest of human civilizations. The urban jungle is swarming with life; and a lot of it isn’t bipedal. Raccoons, squirrels, rats, and other creatures co-exist with us in our cities and towns. But what does life on the mean streets of New York City do to these animals? A new study published in Science Magazine looked into the effects of cities on animals that are commonly found in urban locations. The results show that these animals are adapting and evolving. Roaches, raccoons, squirrels, lice, and more; are all changing. Each new generation is adapting more and more to the environment. The result of this adaptation is incredible resilience. As in any ecosystem, those most suited for the environment will continue to live on. This allows the species to survive and thrive. Rats smart enough to avoid traps may pass on that intelligence. Raccoons strong enough to open dumpsters have more access to food. Roaches that are unaffected by a bug bomb can give way to new generations of resistant broods. While our society continues to advance and grow, so does the overall species of those animals that we share the streets with. We specialize in removing squirrels, raccoons, and other pests in the New York New Jersey area. For a complete inspection and evaluation please contact us or call us at 718-227-7227 and we will be happy to make an appointment at your convenience.

Fearless Squirrels

In the wild, it’s kill or be killed; eat or be eaten. But here, in the urban jungle, the call of the wild is replaced by the honking of horns. Squirrels seem to scurry away and hide when humans and dogs come close, because they are taught to. But in rare cases, squirrels have been known to approach people or animals. Squirrels that approach humans may do so for many reasons: desperation, fear, aggression, hunger, and sometimes unknowingness.
Squirrels don’t know by nature to avoid people. That behavior is learned, whether by experience or parental instruction. Young squirrels are known to approach humans; especially when separated from its family. A squirrel that doesn’t know better may move towards human activity in search of food, shelter, or warmth; just seeking out what it instinctively wants.
A squirrel may come at a human or other animal aggressively for a number of reasons. Most of the time, it is because it feels threatened or desperate to get away, and it chooses fight over flight. In rare cases, a squirrel will become aggressive because of rabies. If at any time a squirrel seems aggressive, you should move away from it. You never want to provoke a squirrel, rabid or not.
If a squirrel is rabid, it is not uncommon to act aggressively towards other squirrels, animals, humans, and even inanimate objects. This level of boldness and aggression is often unprovoked. An aggressive squirrel is not necessarily rabid.
We specialize in removing squirrels, raccoons, and other pests in the New York New Jersey area. For a complete inspection and evaluation please contact us or call us at 718-227-7227 and we will be happy to make an appointment at your convenience.

Coyotes in NYC

It may seem surprising, but there are predatory animals living within New York City. Many New Yorkers think that a deer populations and the occasional raccoon are the only things they have to worry about. But there are small populations of cootes living within the five boroughs. While more common in Staten Island, Queens, and Brooklyn (where there are more wooded/less urbanized areas) they have been reported in all of them.
NYC Coyotes are most often seen on golf courses or in wooded areas. While most will be naturally wary of humans, you can never be too careful with them. In most areas of the city, they will only hunt animals as big as rodents or birds. They will rarely go after deer, and are even less likely to attack people.
Coyotes are canines, and look similar to wolves or some dogs. They have flatter heads, longer legs, and a pointier snout than most domesticated dogs. They are not fully nocturnal, but are most active during dusk and night. Most coyote sightings in the city occur between October to March. From October to January, young coyotes mature and leave the care of their parents. They will seek out a place to make their den; and up until march, will start looking for a mate.
Avoid contact with coyotes, and follow these guidelines to help make sure that coyotes can safely coexist with humans. Do not leave food out for coyotes, and do not directly feed them either. It is important to not make them dependant on humans for their needs. Clean up your garbage at parks, and use garbage cans there. Keep your dogs on a leash at all times when at a park, and leave your cats indoors. If a coyote approaches you, make yourself seem bigger, and make noises to make them run away. This makes them wary of humans. Try to stay far away from coyotes, and do not approach them.
Most coyotes are not dangerous for people. If you spot an aggressive coyote, report it to the golf course staff or a park rangers. In case of a medical emergency from contact with a coyote, please call 911.
We specialize in removing opossums, raccoons, and other pests in the New York New Jersey area. For a complete inspection and evaluation please contact us or call us at 718-227-7227 and we will be happy to make an appointment at your convenience.

 

Rabid Raccoon Captured in Clifton

On September 6th, a rabid raccoon was captured in Clifton, New Jersey after a local resident noticed the animal acting sickly. The raccoon was caught, and brought to the New Jersey Department of Health & Senior Services Public Health Laboratories for testing and treatment. Luckily, the resident noticed the diseased raccoon, and was able to recognize the signs of rabies.
It is important to know the signs and symptoms associated in the event that you encounter a wild animal or pet that might be afflicted with it. Common symptoms include excessive salivating (including drooling and/or foaming at the mouth), dilated pupils, muscle spasms, light sensitivity, fever, seizures, coma, and even death. In nocturnal animals, increased activity in daylight hours can be common.
We specialize in removing opossums, raccoons, and other pests in the New York New Jersey area. For a complete inspection and evaluation please contact us or call us at 718-227-7227 and we will be happy to make an appointment at your convenience.

 

Nocturnal Animals in the Fall

Autumn is approaching fast; and while the nights get longer, the nocturnal animals lurking outside will be more active. In the Fall, the extended night time affords raccoons, opossums, and other nocturnal animals more time to be up and around. During this time, they will scavenge for more food, look for warmer places to live, and caused more damage to your home.  Autumn is approaching fast; and while the nights get longer, the nocturnal animals lurking outside will be more active. In the Fall, the extended night time affords raccoons, opossums, and other nocturnal animals more time to be up and around. During this time, they will scavenge for more food, look for warmer places to live, and caused more damage to your home.

Skunks, raccoons, and other nocturnal animals in our area utilize the natural changes in the day/night cycle in order to better prepare for the winter. Many of these mammals do not hibernate during the cold winters, and will need to prepare to outlast it. During the Fall, as days get colder and nights get longer, they will seek out more food. They may look for ways into your home to escape the growing cold.

The Fall is often the time where the offspring from the Spring start branching off and finding dens of their own. These younger animals may be less aware of how to avoid humans. They may be more inclined to try to break into your home or shed.

We specialize in removing opossums, raccoons, and other pests in the New York New Jersey area. For a complete inspection and evaluation please contact us or call us at 718-227-7227 and we will be happy to make an appointment at your convenience.

The Difference Between Gophers and Groundhogs

When there is a fuzzy little beast ripping up your lawn and tunneling through your garden, there are a number of different animals it can be. The four most common burrowing pests in the New York/New Jersey area are moles, voles, groundhogs, and gophers. Gophers and groundhogs are commonly mistaken for each other, but there are a number of distinct differences separating the two animals. When there is a fuzzy little beast ripping up your lawn and tunneling through your garden, there are a number of different animals it can be. The four most common burrowing pests in the New York/New Jersey area are moles, voles, groundhogs, and gophers. Gophers and groundhogs are commonly mistaken for each other, but there are a number of distinct differences separating the two animals. Gophers are the smaller of the two, growing to only about 2 to 4 pounds in weight. A fully grown groundhog will weigh anywhere from 4 to 14 pounds, and will usually be much bigger than a gopher, so size is the first indicator of with type of pest is ripping up your garden. In completely favorable conditions, with no predators and plenty of food, a groundhog can achieve a weight of 30 pounds or more. Gopher fur can be a range of colors from white to brown to black. It is generally very soft. Depending on the species, a gopher may have stripes, spots, or other distinct markings. A groundhog’s fur is more coarse and is usually brown or rust colored. Gophers have thin, rat-like tails; while a groundhog’s bushy tail will resemble that of a squirrel. Groundhogs are much more comfortable going topside to forage for food. They can eat up to 1.5 pounds of vegetation a day, and will munch on almost all kinds of flowers, vegetables, and bulbs. Gophers tend to attack gardens from below, eating the roots of plants, shrubs, and vegetables. Carrots and radishes in particular are often the targets of gophers. They will often bite and gnaw at the roots, and fill up the pouches in their mouths. They tend to store extra food within the tunnel systems they dig.  Gopher tunnels usually go as deep as 2 feet or so, and feature extensive systems of pathways leading to a number of burrow chambers and exits scattered within the labyrinthian structure. The shape of the exit holes resemble a horseshoe in terms of the excess dirt surrounding it to form a mound. The exit holes of a Groundhog structure is more like a dome dirt pile. Groundhog tunnels are wider and less extensive, with generally only one burrow chamber, towards the back-end of the tunnel system. Groundhogs also usually create a chamber for the sole purpose of excrement, like a bathroom. They may go as deep as 4 feet deep underground.  We specialize in removing gophers, groundhogs, and other pests in the New York New Jersey area. For a complete inspection and evaluation please contact us or call us at 718-227-7227 and we will be happy to make an appointment at your convenience.

Don’t Feed the Pigeons

      When it comes to living in New York City, pigeons are just something that we all have to deal with. From entire flocks walking on the sidewalk, to droppings all over the statues, we have all seen how much of a nuisance these pests can be. But one thing that many New Yorkers do is feed the pigeons, especially in parks. People should not be feeding pigeons, for a variety of reasons. It is important to understand why it is not good for anyone to feed wild pigeons, if you live in a city like New York where populations run rampant. Feeding pigeons can lead to a number of problems, including malnutrition in the birds; and the further spread of diseases, whether just to the other pigeons, or cross-species.

Feeding wildlife of any kind can create a dependency. Why would an animal seek out food if they know they can receive it for just being near a certain park bench? When pigeons, or any other wild animals, find out about a specific spot to get food consistently, they generally stay near that source, and they don’t look elsewhere. That means that more animals will tend to hang around that area. By feeding a pigeon, you are forcing other people who visit the area to deal with a higher concentration of them, and the side effects of that, like higher concentrations of bird feces in the area.

Feeding pigeons can also lead to malnutrition in the animals. Pigeons, while we may not like them, do provide many a service to the city. Some of the seeds that pigeons tend to favor are weeds that could otherwise crop up all over the city. They also eat pest bugs. They clean up our streets by eating food litter.

Pigeons, no matter how urbanized they are, are still a part of the wildlife here. Wildlife should be (as long as it is not on our property) respected, and from afar if possible. You should not want to disturb wild pigeons if possible. It is there city as much as it is ours. It is only when they become a problem or compromise the health of the people that they should be excluded from the ecosystem of the city.

We specialize in removing rats, mice, and other pests in the New York New Jersey area. For a complete inspection and evaluation please contact us or call us at 718-227-7227 and we will be happy to make an appointment at your convenience.

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