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Monthly Archives: October 2017

Fearless Squirrels

In the wild, it’s kill or be killed; eat or be eaten. But here, in the urban jungle, the call of the wild is replaced by the honking of horns. Squirrels seem to scurry away and hide when humans and dogs come close, because they are taught to. But in rare cases, squirrels have been known to approach people or animals. Squirrels that approach humans may do so for many reasons: desperation, fear, aggression, hunger, and sometimes unknowingness.
Squirrels don’t know by nature to avoid people. That behavior is learned, whether by experience or parental instruction. Young squirrels are known to approach humans; especially when separated from its family. A squirrel that doesn’t know better may move towards human activity in search of food, shelter, or warmth; just seeking out what it instinctively wants.
A squirrel may come at a human or other animal aggressively for a number of reasons. Most of the time, it is because it feels threatened or desperate to get away, and it chooses fight over flight. In rare cases, a squirrel will become aggressive because of rabies. If at any time a squirrel seems aggressive, you should move away from it. You never want to provoke a squirrel, rabid or not.
If a squirrel is rabid, it is not uncommon to act aggressively towards other squirrels, animals, humans, and even inanimate objects. This level of boldness and aggression is often unprovoked. An aggressive squirrel is not necessarily rabid.
We specialize in removing squirrels, raccoons, and other pests in the New York New Jersey area. For a complete inspection and evaluation please contact us or call us at 718-227-7227 and we will be happy to make an appointment at your convenience.

Coyotes in NYC

It may seem surprising, but there are predatory animals living within New York City. Many New Yorkers think that a deer populations and the occasional raccoon are the only things they have to worry about. But there are small populations of cootes living within the five boroughs. While more common in Staten Island, Queens, and Brooklyn (where there are more wooded/less urbanized areas) they have been reported in all of them.
NYC Coyotes are most often seen on golf courses or in wooded areas. While most will be naturally wary of humans, you can never be too careful with them. In most areas of the city, they will only hunt animals as big as rodents or birds. They will rarely go after deer, and are even less likely to attack people.
Coyotes are canines, and look similar to wolves or some dogs. They have flatter heads, longer legs, and a pointier snout than most domesticated dogs. They are not fully nocturnal, but are most active during dusk and night. Most coyote sightings in the city occur between October to March. From October to January, young coyotes mature and leave the care of their parents. They will seek out a place to make their den; and up until march, will start looking for a mate.
Avoid contact with coyotes, and follow these guidelines to help make sure that coyotes can safely coexist with humans. Do not leave food out for coyotes, and do not directly feed them either. It is important to not make them dependant on humans for their needs. Clean up your garbage at parks, and use garbage cans there. Keep your dogs on a leash at all times when at a park, and leave your cats indoors. If a coyote approaches you, make yourself seem bigger, and make noises to make them run away. This makes them wary of humans. Try to stay far away from coyotes, and do not approach them.
Most coyotes are not dangerous for people. If you spot an aggressive coyote, report it to the golf course staff or a park rangers. In case of a medical emergency from contact with a coyote, please call 911.
We specialize in removing opossums, raccoons, and other pests in the New York New Jersey area. For a complete inspection and evaluation please contact us or call us at 718-227-7227 and we will be happy to make an appointment at your convenience.

 

Rabid Raccoon Captured in Clifton

On September 6th, a rabid raccoon was captured in Clifton, New Jersey after a local resident noticed the animal acting sickly. The raccoon was caught, and brought to the New Jersey Department of Health & Senior Services Public Health Laboratories for testing and treatment. Luckily, the resident noticed the diseased raccoon, and was able to recognize the signs of rabies.
It is important to know the signs and symptoms associated in the event that you encounter a wild animal or pet that might be afflicted with it. Common symptoms include excessive salivating (including drooling and/or foaming at the mouth), dilated pupils, muscle spasms, light sensitivity, fever, seizures, coma, and even death. In nocturnal animals, increased activity in daylight hours can be common.
We specialize in removing opossums, raccoons, and other pests in the New York New Jersey area. For a complete inspection and evaluation please contact us or call us at 718-227-7227 and we will be happy to make an appointment at your convenience.

 

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