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Monthly Archives: August 2017

Don’t Feed the Pigeons

      When it comes to living in New York City, pigeons are just something that we all have to deal with. From entire flocks walking on the sidewalk, to droppings all over the statues, we have all seen how much of a nuisance these pests can be. But one thing that many New Yorkers do is feed the pigeons, especially in parks. People should not be feeding pigeons, for a variety of reasons. It is important to understand why it is not good for anyone to feed wild pigeons, if you live in a city like New York where populations run rampant. Feeding pigeons can lead to a number of problems, including malnutrition in the birds; and the further spread of diseases, whether just to the other pigeons, or cross-species.

Feeding wildlife of any kind can create a dependency. Why would an animal seek out food if they know they can receive it for just being near a certain park bench? When pigeons, or any other wild animals, find out about a specific spot to get food consistently, they generally stay near that source, and they don’t look elsewhere. That means that more animals will tend to hang around that area. By feeding a pigeon, you are forcing other people who visit the area to deal with a higher concentration of them, and the side effects of that, like higher concentrations of bird feces in the area.

Feeding pigeons can also lead to malnutrition in the animals. Pigeons, while we may not like them, do provide many a service to the city. Some of the seeds that pigeons tend to favor are weeds that could otherwise crop up all over the city. They also eat pest bugs. They clean up our streets by eating food litter.

Pigeons, no matter how urbanized they are, are still a part of the wildlife here. Wildlife should be (as long as it is not on our property) respected, and from afar if possible. You should not want to disturb wild pigeons if possible. It is there city as much as it is ours. It is only when they become a problem or compromise the health of the people that they should be excluded from the ecosystem of the city.

We specialize in removing rats, mice, and other pests in the New York New Jersey area. For a complete inspection and evaluation please contact us or call us at 718-227-7227 and we will be happy to make an appointment at your convenience.

Which Rat is That?

The two most common rat species in the Northern US, but especially New York City, are the Norway and Roof rats. Both can gain entry to your home easily, cause damage greatly, and carry a large host of diseases. Knowing what kind of rat infestation you have can help identify how they got into your home, or where they may be nesting within it.  The two most common rat species in the Northern US, but especially New York City, are the Norway and Roof rats. Both can gain entry to your home easily, cause damage greatly, and carry a large host of diseases. Knowing what kind of rat infestation you have can help identify how they got into your home, or where they may be nesting within it.

Norway rats are large rats that can weigh over 8 ounces. Roof rats weigh about 10 ounces when fully grown. Norway rats can grow to be 40 cm in length. Roof rats are smaller and sleeker than the Norway, but can reach a length of about the same size. The tail of a Roof rat makes up most of it’s length, while a Norway rat’s tail is shorter than it’s body. Norway rats have very shaggy fur that can be either brown or gray. Roof rats have smooth hair that is generally brown or black. Both rats are omnivorous, but have a liking for fruits, nuts, and grains. Rats tend to hide and sleep during the day, and are very active at night. Seeing an active rat during the day usually means that there is a very large amount of them in that particular colony. Norwegian rats have scales on their ears and tails, while the Roof rats have scales on only their tails.

Norway rats have anywhere from 4-22 litters a year, each consisting of of 3-12 offspring. Roof rats have about 4-6 litters per year, with about 6-8 offspring each time.

Rat droppings found in your home can help determine the type of rat you are infested with.Roof rat droppings are about 12-13 mm long, while Norway rat droppings are about 18-20 mm.

Roof rats get their name from their excellent climbing ability and usually tend to live higher up in structures. They are also commonly referred to as black rats, ship rats, or house rats. Norway rats are much better at digging and can burrow into buildings. Their alternate names include the common rat, brown rat, or sewer rat.

While both use the walls of a building for colony uses, Norway rats have less of a tendency to live in the attic. Both rats live for about a year, but can produce litters year round. Holes in the eaves, roof, foundation, and walls of your home can allow these rats to gain entry. Non-screened windows and open doors can also be entry points for either variety.

Both rats carry a large assortment of diseases, but roof rats have been known to carry the Bubonic Plague. While this disease is no longer a huge threat to the public, it can make you very sick, and spread. There are very few cases of this disease in America yearly. If you see rats or evidence of them in your home, such as a nest or droppings, do not touch them, or get close to them. Call a wildlife removal specialist as soon as possible, to avoid and limit contact with harmful diseases.

We specialize in removing rats, mice, and other pests in the New York New Jersey area. For a complete inspection and evaluation please contact us or call us at 718-227-7227 and we will be happy to make an appointment at your convenience.

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